ONLINE EXHIBITION

NICK MCPHAIL, SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL, ANTOINE WAGNER, WARNER WILLIAMS MATCH GROUP SHOW 22.02 - 26.02

GALERIE UNTITLED I983 is pleased to present the group show MATCH featuring works by Nick McPhail, Warner Williams, Sophie Treppendahl and Antoine Wagner.

Prompted by the unprecedented situation that has imposed pause on all our lives, Untitled1983 invites the four artists to undertake an exercise of self reflection and observation, to look back at their oeuvre as a means to elucidating a sense of self and identity. 

Entitled MATCH, the exhibition features two works selected by each artist presented as a pair. By pairing the works in this way, the individuality of the pieces is subdued, refocusing the attention of the viewer towards the relationship between the two. Insight from the artist's selection infuses the works with new meaning, providing a glimpse to their process, practice and sense of self.

You are invited to explore the works online. Short interviews and artist commentaries accompany each match.


SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL

River Stripes, Afternoon, 2018, Oil on canvas, 76 x 101cm

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SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL

Self Aware Landscape 1, 2020, Oil on canvas

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Sophie Treppendahl Interview Part 1


Mighela Lorenceau: In our current time and circumstance, what has become essential to you?


Sophie Treppendahl: I'm going to cheat and list three things. Firstly, amaro, or more specifically amaro daiquiris. I can thank and blame my husband for introducing me to these. It's the perfect sip at the end of the day. Second, house plants. Our house looks like a greenhouse these days with all my new green friends. I've become obsessed with watching them grow, checking for new buds each day when I come home. Third, a new favorite podcast called "You're Wrong About...". This podcast has been my constant companion, whether I am out on a walk, in the studio, at home cooking, or on one of the many long road trips taken this year. It's educational, lighthearted and makes me feel like I'm hanging out with two new friends (the hosts) all day long.


Mighela Lorenceau: Could you talk about the works you have selected for this exhibition?


Sophie Treppendahl: The two paintings included are a playful pair that speak well to each other. The first is River Stripes, Afternoon (2018), depicts a day at the James River in Richmond, Virginia where I lived for a few years. The river was my muse while I lived there. The painting was of a day when I was working in my studio, taunted by the perfect weather outside. I decided it was time for a break and drove to my favorite spot for an afternoon dip. The second piece, Self Aware Landscape Painting (2020), is a more recent work that in some ways pokes fun at the first painting by being a landscape painting (also of the James River) from the view of my studio. The piece is a lighthearted critique of my own work as it shows the process of painting a lush, outdoor landscape using a photo on the laptop as the source, dispelling romantic notions of the way I, and others, often paint landscapes nowadays. I paint from photos all the time, sometimes on my computer or even on my phone. I believe there's no wrong way to paint, but it's fun to make fun of myself sometimes.

SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL


Sophie Treppendahl Interview Part 2


Mighela Lorenceau: Which other artist do you look up to at the moment?


Sophie Treppendahl: It's hard to just name one. But a few contemporary artists I've been admiring lately are Kyle Staver, Caleb Hahne, Lois Dodd and my friend Ryan Syrell.


Mighela Lorenceau: If you could conduct an art heist and steal any work you love from a museum, which one would it be?


Sophie Treppendahl: Based on all my previous answers, you can go ahead and bet it's not just one painting, but two. The first is Vuillard's The Yellow Curtain. I must think about this painting every other day. The yellow is just perfect, that pattern on the wall is luscious. The way the yellow wraps around the composition, and then that bed frame perfectly breaks up the color block. It's a masterpiece of color and just everything is in the perfect place. My second piece would be Table with Fruit by David Park. Again so much of my love for this piece is the way the image uses the canvas. And so many little things that add up to a perfect painting: the yellow of the table (see, it would look GREAT alongside my Vuillard), the empty chair giving us a little bit of the floor, the hand on the table, the bits of pattern on the short and the curtain. It was the first piece in a retrospective of his work I saw last year, and I think I returned to stare at it maybe eight more times.

KUNDRY V, Production:Antoine Wagner Studio

ANTOINE WAGNER

Kundry V, C-print with enlarger, 158cm x 259cm x 5,5cm, Edition of 5 plus 2 artist's proofs


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ANTOINE WAGNER

Portrait of Antoine Wagner, 2021

For the exhibition MATCH, I decided to show a diptych work from the Kundry series, Kundry V which was taken on the Etna Volcano in Sicily in 2015. For the theme of the show, the notion of self reflection immediately came to mind. These mirrored prints seemed like a good answer, an image looking at itself. Kundry uses large format analogue photography to tell the legend of Parsifal. The myths core theme of redemption is analyzed and deconstructed by this mirroring process in the work. This particular work, Kundry V, takes place in the beginning of Act II in the narrative as Kundrian and Parsifal embark on their voyage through the unknown on their way to retrieve the Holy Grail. In the classical template of narration of the hero's journey, this would be the call to adventure. This body of work's intention is to treat the photo paper like a musical stave, inducing synesthesia, making the audience hear something while looking at something. Moving the senses closer to one another, overlapping almost.

NICK MCPHAIL

Studio of Nick Mcphail in Los Angeles

NICK MCPHAIL

Sunlight, 2020, Oil on Canvas, 101 x 76cm

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An Interview with Nick McPhail Part 1

Mighela Lorenceau: Hi Nick, could you tell us about your practice?

Nick McPhail: My paintings are based on photographs that I take on exploratory walks. These photographs are just a starting point, and I freely manipulate the image using memory, intuition and emotion. I often layer imagery on top of earlier versions within the painting, leaving traces of earlier compositions. To me, this is a reflection of the remembered history of a place, blurred or augmented, and how it changes with time and human action. 

I am drawn to the idea of visual access to public and private spaces. I often focus on windows of vision from public into private, or vice versa, through which an observer is allowed or denied. I am interested in architectural objects that are used to deny access, and how these objects obstruct a pedestrian's sightline. Elements like bars on windows, stairs, power lines, trees and fences break up our field of vision constantly, yet tend to go unnoticed. Through my paintings, I am reallocating attention to these elements that usually reside in our periphery. 




NICK MCPHAIL

View, 2020, Oil on canvas, 28 x 35cm

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An Interview with Nick McPhail Part 2


Mighela Lorenceau: Could you tell us about the works that you selected for the exhibition?


Nick McPhail: I selected these two paintings for "Match" because they are similar meditations on these themes. In each painting the viewer is clear on where they stand in relation to the composition, but is left with only a fragment of a scene. The mind is allowed space to automatically fill in missing information that has been hindered or cropped out of view. In Sunlight the architecture is left mostly unobstructed, while with "View" the tree acts as a screening mechanism and the viewer must work a little harder to see the windows behind.

Warner Williams

The Swimmer, 2015, Oil on canvas, 82x97cm

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An Interview with Warner Williams Part 1

Mighela Lorenceau: If you could carry out an art heist, steal any work you love from a museum, which one would it be?


Warner Williams: I would take the Birth of Venus by Botticelli, but my apartment is too small to fit the painting. I wouldn't steal anything, because my mama told me not to.

Warner Williams

Woman and pool with umbrella, 1989, Oil on canvas, 96 x 137cm

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Mighela Lorenceau: In our current time and circumstance, what has become essential to you?


Warner Williams: Painting.


Mighela Lorenceau: Could you tell us a bit about the works you chose for this exhibition?


Warner Williams: These paintings are about light and space. The earlier work, Woman and pool with umbrella (1989) has a female figure in it, one of the few in my paintings. I rarely paint people so explicitly, possibly because of Asperger Syndrome. I would rather paint the space around them. The second painting, The Swimmer (2015) has no figure, despite the title alluding to one. I was inspired by the Burt Lancaster movie of the same name. I thought it was an existentialist masterpiece.


Mighela Lorenceau: Which other artists do you look up to at the moment?


Warner Williams: Leonardo da Vinci! I saw a long lost Leonardo painting of blue waves that I keep thinking about. I see this brown boat with beautiful blue waves.

SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL

River Stripes, Afternoon

River Stripes, Afternoon, 2018, Oil on canvas, 76 x 101cm

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SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL

River Stripes, Afternoon

SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL

River Stripes, Afternoon

River Stripes, Afternoon, 2018, Oil on canvas, 76 x 101cm

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SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL

Self Aware Landscape 1

Self Aware Landscape 1, 2020, Oil on canvas

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SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL

Self Aware Landscape 1

SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL

Self Aware Landscape 1

Self Aware Landscape 1, 2020, Oil on canvas

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SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL

Portrait


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SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL

Portrait

SOPHIE TREPPENDAHL

Portrait


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ANTOINE WAGNER

Antoine Wagner

Kundry V, C-print with enlarger, 158cm x 259cm x 5,5cm, Edition of 5 plus 2 artist's proofs


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ANTOINE WAGNER

Antoine Wagner

ANTOINE WAGNER

Antoine Wagner

Kundry V, C-print with enlarger, 158cm x 259cm x 5,5cm, Edition of 5 plus 2 artist's proofs


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ANTOINE WAGNER

Portrait

Portrait of Antoine Wagner, 2021

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ANTOINE WAGNER

Portrait

ANTOINE WAGNER

Portrait

Portrait of Antoine Wagner, 2021

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NICK MCPHAIL

Studio of Nick Mcphail in Los Angeles

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NICK MCPHAIL

NICK MCPHAIL

Studio of Nick Mcphail in Los Angeles

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NICK MCPHAIL

Sunlight

Sunlight, 2020, Oil on Canvas, 101 x 76cm

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NICK MCPHAIL

Sunlight

NICK MCPHAIL

Sunlight

Sunlight, 2020, Oil on Canvas, 101 x 76cm

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NICK MCPHAIL

View

View, 2020, Oil on canvas, 28 x 35cm

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NICK MCPHAIL

View

NICK MCPHAIL

View

View, 2020, Oil on canvas, 28 x 35cm

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Warner Williams

The Swimmer

The Swimmer, 2015, Oil on canvas, 82x97cm

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Warner Williams

The Swimmer

Warner Williams

The Swimmer

The Swimmer, 2015, Oil on canvas, 82x97cm

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Warner Williams

Woman with Umbrella

Woman and pool with umbrella, 1989, Oil on canvas, 96 x 137cm

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Warner Williams

Woman with Umbrella

Warner Williams

Woman with Umbrella

Woman and pool with umbrella, 1989, Oil on canvas, 96 x 137cm

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